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With baby boomers approaching the age of 65 and new cases of Alzheimer’s disease expected to increase by 50 percent by the year 2030, Georgia Tech researchers have created a tool that allows adults to screen themselves for early signs of dementia. The home-based computer software is patterned after the paper-and-pencil Clock Drawing Test, one of health care’s most commonly used screening exams for cognitive impairment.

Ronald Arkin (Interactive Comp) believes that countries will inevitably deploy independent robots capable of killing an enemy without a human pushing a button. Source: AFP

 

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Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp), using Simon the robot as her student, is redefining how robots and humans interact. She sees a future where any “naive user” (or nonprogrammer) could buy a robot, take it home, and instruct it to do almost anything. Source: Popular Science

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Researchers in Georgia Tech’s Center for Behavior Imaging have developed two new technological tools that automatically measure relevant behaviors of children, and promise to have significant impact on the understanding of behavioral disorders such as autism.

To build the underwater communications devices, marine biologist Denise Herzing partnered with the Wearable Computing Lab at Georgia Tech run by Thad Starner (Interactive Comp). “To really prove the value of the algorithm, we hope to use it to help Denise learn something new about dolphin vocalization,” Starner says. Source: Outside Magazine

 

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Popular Science has named Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp) one of 2012’s “Brilliant 10,” an award given by the publication to ten scientists under 40 whose innovations will change the world. Source: Office of Communications

A small group of scholars is grappling with what could be the next generation of weaponry: lethal autonomous robots. At the center of the debate is Ronald C. Arkin (Interactive Comp) who has hypothesized lethal weapons systems that are ethically superior to human soldiers on the battlefield. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

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Students learn faster when learning from robots that make mistakes. Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp) comments on a new study by Japanese researchers. Source: TechCrunch

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Perplexed robots make better teachers. "Anything that gets a person more actively engaged and motivated is going to be beneficial to the learning process," says Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp). "So needing to teach the robot is a great way of doing that." Source: The Atlantic

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Students consider the schools on this list as the most technologically advanced in the U.S.  The College of Computing is a pioneer in the “new face of computing” establishing a more diversified engineering discipline. Source: Mashable

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