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James Rehg (Interactive Comp) and other researchers have released a study on the possible application of machine learning technology, burrowed from computer science, to areas of biology that use microscopic examination of model genetic organisms. Source: Phys.org

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Professors Wenke Lee and Keith Edwards have been named directors of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) and the GVU Center, respectively, College of Computing Dean Zvi Galil announced Aug. 1. Source: Office of Communications

Computer-generated characters have become so lifelike in appearance and movement that the line separating reality is almost imperceptible at times. But while bipeds and quadrupeds have reigned supreme in CG animation, attempts to create and control their skeleton-free cousins using similar techniques has proved time-consuming and laborious.

Georgia Tech researchers have found a possible solution to this challenge by developing a way to simulate and control movement of computer-generated characters without a skeletal structure, anything from starfish and earthworms to an elephant’s trunk or the human tongue.

Charlie Kemp (Interactive Comp) and his team are working to build robots that help the disabled with everyday tasks; a stroke victim is already successfully using one of the robots in his home. Source: CBS News

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Researchers have developed an electronic glove that can teach you to play the piano. Dr. Tanya Markow (Interactive Comp) helped create the glove. Source: Marketplace

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Music can affect the way we feel--this shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone, but the Mobile Music Touch (MMT) device created by a group of Georgia Tech researchers, led by Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp) both surprises and delights. Source: PCWorld

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A wireless musical glove developed by Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp) not only teaches users to play songs on the piano, but may also improve the sensation and mobility of the hands of people who have suffered spinal cord injuries. Source: CNET

 

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A new wireless glove that can teach piano lessons could help people with spinal cord injuries regain some motor control, according to Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp). Source: Popular Science

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Georgia Tech Researchers, led by Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp) have developed a wireless glove that is designed to improve mobility and sensation in people with spinal cord injuries. Source: Forbes

 

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Thad Starner (Interactive Comp), a technical lead at Google, said his initial motivation for developing a wearable computer was that he wanted to be a better student: "I decided to make a system that would let me take notes while I was also paying attention in class, and better retain things." Source: The Boston Globe

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