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A research team led by Mike Stilman (Interactive Comp), a rock star in robotics, says its "MacGyver" robot can use the everyday objects it comes across to accomplish high-level tasks. A new promotional video for the school shows the potential for this robot and other next-generation bots. Source: Fox News

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Ian Bogost (Interactive Comp) demonstrates an astonishingly intuitive visual interface which enables a journalist with zero programming skill to turn any news story into a plethora of different custom-designed games in seconds. Source: Innovation Investment Journal

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For the millions of Americans who live with paralysis, mentally controlling artificial limbs and mobility devices would be a big step forward toward more independent living. Melody Moore Jackson (Interactive Comp) is trying to make that happen. Source: CNN

 

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Researchers, led by Ellen Yi-Luen Do (Interactive Comp) recently revealed that they are developing a tool that allows adults to test themselves for dementia in the comfort of their own home. Source: Gizmag

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Forbes named the College of Computing at Georgia Tech one of the top ten colleges for your bank account with the average starting salary for graduates being $60,387. Source: Forbes

 

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Groundbreaking research by Gregory Abowd (Interactive Comp) could be paving the way for the early detection of autism. Researchers are using special gaze-tracking glasses to measure eye contact in children, a lack of which is often a tell-tale sign of autism. Source: WSB TV

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Digits is a "really nice piece of work", says Thad Starner (Interactive Comp), who is also technical lead on Google's Project Glass. Digits is in its early stages, says Starner, who has been using a wearable computer for almost 20 years. Source: New Scientist

 

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Researchers, led by Ellen Yi-Luen Do (Interactive Comp) recently revealed that they are developing a tool that allows adults to test themselves for dementia in the comfort of their own home. Source: RedOrbit

 

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Led by Mike Stilman (Interactive Comp), the team at Georgia Tech will use a three-year $900,000 grant from the Office of Naval Research to develop a bot that uses a custom algorithm to scan a room for random objects, size up their usefulness and functions, and then use it to accomplish a more complex task. Source: Gizmodo

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Currently, robots aren’t yet quick thinkers on their feet. Mike Stilman (Interactive Comp) wants to change that. He’s working on robots that can identify random objects in their environments and use them as tools to accomplish high-level tasks. Source: NBC News

 

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