News

ATLANTA – Dec. 12, 2012 – For the second straight year, the College of Computing's  Holiday Gift Guide decks the halls with some of the more inspired, ambitious and definitely digital “gifts” ever placed under the virtual tree. Source: Office of Communications

In a 2007 study, researchers from Georgia Tech's College of Computing looked at the ways in which Roomba owners bonded with their gadgets. Source: Yahoo! News

 

Visit Website

Ronald Arkin (Interactive Comp) and his grad students programmed a similar strategy into some wheeled robots, and the tactic worked--the decepticon deceiving robot lured a “predator” to false locations. This could have great practical value in military situations, the researchers say. Source: Popular Science

Visit Website

Using deceptive behavioral patterns of squirrels and birds, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed robots that are able to deceive each other. The research is funded by the Office of Naval Research and is led by Professor Ronald Arkin, who suggests the applications could be implemented by the military in the future. The research is highlighted in the November/December 2012 edition of IEEE Intelligent Systems.

Noted academic and game designer Ian Bogost (Interactive Comp) created a satirical Facebook game named Cow Clicker, for instance, whose purpose was to satirise the dull stupidity of many early social games. Source: TechCrunch

 

Visit Website

A glove developed by Tanya Markow (Interactive Comp) can teach people to play the piano and help those with spinal cord injuries regain sensation in their hands. Source: CNN

Visit Website

Sitting in front of a camera and giving a lecture to students you can’t see is intimidating. This is just one of the things that Tucker Balch has learned about the process of teaching a massive open online course (or MOOC) through Coursera.

According to a study by Eric Gilbert (Interactive Comp), even though negative gossip was 2.7 times more likely to appear in an employee's inbox, all gossip was an important exchange of social information. Source: Huffington Post

 

Visit Website

Georgia Tech is joining a revolution in higher education by offering online courses to anyone anywhere for free. "It's hard to imagine a better way to affect more people, to influence their thinking on a subject," said Professor Tucker Balch (Interactive Comp), who's the first at Tech to videotape his lectures, then post them online. Source: 11 Alive

Visit Website

"It's hard to imagine a better way to affect more people, to influence their thinking on a subject," said Professor Tucker Balch (Interactive Comp), who's the first at Georgia Tech to videotape his lectures, then post them online. Source: The Examiner

 

Visit Website