GVU Center Brown Bag: Elisabetta Matsumoto "Twisted Topological Tangles or: the knot theory of knitting"

Time: 
Thursday, February 20, 2020 - 11:30am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Technology Square Research Building, 1st Floor Ballroom, Atlanta, Ga

Event Details

Abstract:

Imagine a 1D curve, then use it to fill a 2D manifold that covers an arbitrary 3D object – this computationally intensive materials challenge has been realized in the ancient technology known as knitting. This process for making functional materials 2D materials from 1D portable cloth dates back to prehistory, with the oldest known examples dating from the 11th century BCE. Knitted textiles are ubiquitous as they are easy and cheap to create, lightweight, portable, flexible and stretchy. As with many functional materials, the key to knitting’s extraordinary properties lies in its microstructure.

At the 1D level, knits are composed of an interlocking series of slip knots. At the most basic level there is only one manipulation that creates a knitted stitch – pulling a loop of yarn through another loop. However, there exist hundreds of books with thousands of patterns of stitches with seemingly unbounded complexity.

The topology of knitted stitches has a profound impact on the geometry and elasticity of the resulting fabric. This puts a new spin on additive manufacturing – not only can stitch pattern control the local and global geometry of a textile, but the creation process encodes mechanical properties within the material itself. Unlike standard additive manufacturing techniques, the innate properties of the yarn and the stitch microstructure has a direct effect on the global geometric and mechanical outcome of knitted fabrics.

Speaker Bio:

Elisabetta Matsumoto is an assistant professor in the School of Physics at Georgia Institute of Technology. Her physics research centers around the relationship between geometry and material properties in soft systems, including liquid crystals, 3D printing and textiles. She is also interested in using sewing, 3D printing and virtual reality in mathematical art and education. She is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award. She studied physics at the University of Pennsylvania, earning her BA and MS in 2007 and her PhD in 2011. She has been knitting and crocheting since she was about 12 and has been sewing for longer than she can remember.

Schedule of Brown Bag Speakers Spring 2020

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