News

A week after the World Cup title game in Rio de Janeiro, teams from 45 countries will face off at RoboCup about 1,200 miles away in the Brazilian coastal town of João Pessoa.

Henrik Christensen received the Engelberger Award in 2011 for his role in robotics education. As a professor at Georgia Tech, he carries out various research projects with an eye always toward “real problems with real solutions.” He’s published some 300 papers in the field dealing with big-picture topics from robot vision to artificial intelligence.

He recently made the startling prediction that robotics is advancing sufficiently such that children born today will never actually drive a car.

Visit Website

Several years ago, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers created a technology-enhanced glove that can teach beginners how to play piano melodies in 45 minutes. Now they’ve advanced the same wearable computing technology to help people learn how to read and write Braille. The twist is that people wearing the glove don’t have to pay attention. They learn while doing something else.

Google hopes Made With Code will invade both households and classrooms. It has pledged a $15 million investment over the next three years in computer-science grants to develop the Girls and computer-science education system. It has also partnered with national organizations like the Girl Scouts to bring coding to programs in which girls already participate.

Atlanta-based predictive analysis startup, Lucena, is taking on Wall Street. Co-founded by Georgia Tech's Prof. Tucker Balch, Lucena is using software to replace "quants" in the financial investment industry. 

Visit Website

Assistant Professor Mike Stilman, recognized as an emerging leader in humanoid robotics research, died following an apparent accident at his Atlanta home on Tuesday, May 6.

By creating proactive, accessible health and wellness technologies, Georgia Tech has taken significant steps in enabling people to control their own health to greater, more effective degrees. Highlighting Georgia Tech’s health research strategy are three projects focused on personal technologies and networked computing tools designed to radically change how users interact with health care information and systems. 

Prof. Henrik Christensen discusses what Google might do with its recently acquired robot companies. 

Visit Website