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Is it possible for scientists to predict genocide? "Spreadsheets and Global Mayhem" follows the work of scientists, like Georgia Tech's Michael Best, whose research tracks and predicts trends of mass-violence using machine-learning tools. 

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Instagram pictures with human faces are 38 percent more likely to receive likes than photos with no faces. They’re also 32 percent more likely to attract comments.

The College of Computing once again ranks among the Top 10 computer science programs in the nation with the release today of the 2014 graduate school rankings by U.S. News & World Report.

Thad Starner has been wearing some kind of computer on his head for twenty years. Now the Georgia Tech professor and Google Glass pioneer wants the world to join him. Source: Atlanta Magazine

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"Things are getting interesting," says Thad Starner, Google's technical lead on Glass, which is expected to go on sale commercially this year. It's now in the hands of tens of thousands of folks who purchased the $1,500 device after writing a successful pitch to Google.

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In the age of mashups, fan fiction and content sharing, online media creation has spurred new complexities in copyright, effectively turning the legal concept of “fair use” on its ear, according to a new study from Georgia Tech.

Thad Starner’s work at MIT’s Media Lab would later lay some of the groundwork for Google Glass. Since 2010, he been a technical lead for the project, as well as the founder and director of the Contextual Computing Group at Georgia Tech’s College of Computing. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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“People are mainly friends with those who share similar values and interests" in a "phenomenon called homophily," wrote Catherine Grevet, the Georgia Tech Ph.D. student who led the study. "But that means they rarely interact with the few friends with differing opinions." Source: NBC News

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A new study suggests that politics are the great divider on social media. People who think the majority of their friends have differing opinions than their own engage less on Facebook. For those who choose to stay logged in and politically active, the research found that most tend to stick in their own circles, ignore those on the other side and become more polarized.