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Georgia Tech researchers, led by Professor Melody Moore Jackson, have developed a wearable vest for service dogs that allows them to pull a tab to evoke specific vocal commands. The ability for service dogs to vocally communicate with people has life-changing (and saving) implications.

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Do-it-yourself day traders are building algorithms to get better results from their financial bets. They're learning the computing skills they need for modern trading by enrolling in online classes such as Georgia Tech's "Computational Investing" by Tucker Balch. The trend is catching on...

 
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I’ve been engaged in the debate over autonomous robotic military systems for almost 10 years. I am not averse to a ban, but I’m convinced we should continue researching this technology for the time being. One reason is that I believe such systems might be capable of reducing civilian casualties and property damage when compared to the performance of human warfighters. Thus, it is a contention that calling for an outright ban on this technology is premature, as some groups already are doing.

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Google Glass, Fitbits, and the Apple Watch are just the latest products in a long evolution of wearable technology. One of the earliest examples was developed in 1955: a computer the size of a deck of cards, wedged in a shoe, to help gamblers up the odds on roulette in Vegas. Then, in the early 1990s, Georgia Tech computing professor Thad Starner started wearing his homebrew computing device: safety goggles with a personal display glued to them, attached to a small handheld controller and a wireless modem. He later went on to work on Google's Project Glass.

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Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking, and a host of other science and tech luminaries today added their names to a document from the Future of Life Institute called, "Autonomous Weapons: an Open Letter from AI & Robotics Researchers." The text of the letter, presented at the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Buenos Aires, Argentina, calls for stopping a weaponized AI arms race in its tracks before countries and companies are forced to compete with each other to build deadlier and deadlier autonomous weapons.

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It’s hard to believe that the iPhone debuted only eight years ago. In less than a decade, we’ve somehow bounded from wide-eyed dazzle over “the future of technology” to a sort of mass ennui — yeah, we’re helplessly dependent on our apps, so what? Old news.

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